Off Campus Login

Getting into the AUM Library’s electronic resources such as databases and ebooks is now even easier!
Just login using your AUM email user name and password like you do in the labs on campus and for your My AUM account.
If you do not know your AUM E-mail address, please select the following link to look it up:
AUM Email & Student Account lookup.
If you don’t remember your e-mail password, please contact IT Services at 244-3500.
For other questions please contact the AUM Library Reference desk 244-3649.

Season’s Readings!

Find these, and other good reads for the holidays in our Browsing Collection on the second floor.
The Litigators by John Grisham
The Crimson Warning by Tasha Alexander
Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks
Lionheart by Sharon Kaye Penman
The Dovekeepers by Alice Hoffman
As the Pig Turns by M.C. Beaton
The Revisionists by Thomas Mullen
I Am Half Sick of Shadows by Alan Bradley
The Prague Cemetery by Umberto Eco
The Christmas Homecoming by Anne Perry
Lost December by Richard Evans
Kill Alex Cross by James Patterson
V is for Vengeance by Sue Grafton
Blue Nights by Joan Didion
The Paris Wife by Paula Mclain
Secret Obsession by Kimberla Lawson Roby
Best Wishes for a New Year filled with wonderful reading!

Pearl Harbor Day

On the morning of December 7, 1941, Japanese bombers staged a surprise attack on U.S. military and naval forces in Hawaii. In a devastating defeat, the United States suffered 3,435 casualties and loss of or severe damage to 188 planes, 8 battleships, 3 light cruisers, and 4 miscellaneous vessels. Japanese losses were less than 100 personnel, 29 planes, and 5 midget submarines.
Check out the featured documents related to the attack at the National Archives Center for Legislative Archives. They feature the original radar plot of the incoming planes from Detector Station Opana and the Reading Copy of President Roosevelt’s address to Congress, which was thought to have been lost until 1984 when it was found within the records of the Senate.
Find books in the AUM Library by searching the catalog using the subject heading, Pearl Harbor (Hawaii), Attack on, 1941 and read more about it.

Test drive the new Multi-Search service

arrow-icon.gif Click here to try out the new Multi-Search service!

What is Multi-Search?
Multi-Search is our implementation of the EBSCO Discovery search tool, or EDS for short. It allows users to search almost all of the Libraries’ resources from a single search box. You might think of Multi-Search as your one-stop source for Library research.
What does Multi-Search do?
Multi-Search contains over seventy databases to which the Library subscribes, plus hundreds of ebooks and other electronic resources, and our Library catalog.
Some of the most popular databases that are currently part of Multi-Search include:
Academic Search Premier
Business & Company Resource Center
Cinahl Nursing
ERIC
JSTOR
ProQuest Newspapers
PsychINFO
ScienceDirect
How is Multi-Search different than other databases I’ve used?
Multi-Search is basically a “super-database.” Individual databases like Academic Search Premier and JSTOR house their own content. Multi-Search allows you to search a large number of databases simultaneously and view the results in one unified list. As with many of our other databases you can them limit your search results by various criteria, such as viewing only articles which contain full-text or come from peer-reviewed journals.
I’m having trouble using Multi-Search. How can I get some help?
If you’re having a problem using Multi-Search, here are some ways in which you can get assistance:
- Call the Reference Desk at (334) 244-3649 during our hours of operation
- Use our Ask A Librarian service
- Stop by the Reference Desk for help

Will Multi-Search replace the subject-specific databases I already know and like?

No. We want you to think of Multi-Search as a powerful tool to assist in the research process. Use it as much as possible, and we encourage you to provide us with feedback about Multi-Search as you do so. But we are not planning to cancel any databases simply because we now have Multi-Search. It is a tool to enhance our collections, and not to replace any existing resources.
arrow-icon.gif If you’d like to share your thoughts on Multi-Search, please take this brief survey.

Good Reads for Autumn Days and Nights

All In: What it Takes to be the Best by Gene Chizik
America’s Quarterback: Bart Starr and the Rise of the National Football League by Keith Dunnavant
Silent Girl by Tess Gerritsen
Acceptable Loss by Anne Perry
A Stolen Life: A Memoir by Jaycee Dugard
Paris Wife by Paula McLain
Women of the Cousins’ War: The Duchess, the Queen and the King’s Mother by Philippa Gregory
Frozen Stiff by Annelise Ryan
Lethal by Sandra Brown
Heartwishes by Jude Deveraux
Naughty in Nice by Rhys Bowen
Secret Obsession by Kimberla Lawson Roby
Keeper of Lost Causes by Jussi Adler-olsen
Flash and Bones by Kathy Reichs
Unbroken : a World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and redemption by Laura Hillenbrand
Find them in the Browsing Collection on the second floor. Happy Reading!

Halloween Open House

The Itsy Bitsy Spider has crawled up the water spout and into the AUM Library…where he has set up shop and grown! Come see him and all his friends on Tuesday, October 25th from 12:30 to 1:30 and join us for some Halloween treats.
See you there for a howling good time!

Printing Changes

The staff members of the AUM Library are pleased to announce an additional benefit for the students at AUM. The Library has purchased the Pharos print management software that allows students to print using their AUM printing account. Students will now be able to print from the computers on the second floor of the Library using their AUM print accounts. When sending a print request simply log it as yours and give the job a name, then go to the print station outside the classroom/lab and login to release the job. No more cash required to print in black and white! Each student is given $50.00 in printing costs each semester.
Photocopies are still only ten cents a page for black and white, and 25 cents for color copying or printing.
Ask at the reference desk if you have any questions.

Banned Books Week

September 24−October 1, 2011
http://www.ala.org/ala/issuesadvocacy/banned/bannedbooksweek/index.cfm
Banned Books Week (BBW) is an annual event celebrating the freedom to read and the importance of the First Amendment. Held during the last week of September, Banned Books Week highlights the benefits of free and open access to information while drawing attention to the harms of censorship by spotlighting actual or attempted bannings of books across the United States.
Intellectual freedom—the freedom to access information and express ideas, even if the information and ideas might be considered unorthodox or unpopular—provides the foundation for Banned Books Week. BBW stresses the importance of ensuring the availability of unorthodox or unpopular viewpoints for all who wish to read and access them.
The books featured during Banned Books Week have been targets of attempted bannings. Fortunately, while some books were banned or restricted, in a majority of cases the books were not banned, all thanks to the efforts of librarians, teachers, booksellers, and members of the community to retain the books in the library collections. Imagine how many more books might be challenged—and possibly banned or restricted—if librarians, teachers, and booksellers across the country did not use Banned Books Week each year to teach the importance of our First Amendment rights and the power of literature, and to draw attention to the danger that exists when restraints are imposed on the availability of information in a free society.
Banned Books Week is sponsored by the American Booksellers Association; American Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression; the American Library Association; American Society of Journalists and Authors; Association of American Publishers; and the National Association of College Stores. It is endorsed by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress. In 2011, the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund; National Coalition Against Censorship; National Council of Teachers of English; and PEN American Center also signed on as sponsors.
For more information on getting involved with Banned Books Week: Celebrating the Freedom to Read, please see Calendar of Events, Ideas and Resources, and the new Banned Books Week site. You can also contact the ALA Office for Intellectual Freedom at 1-800-545-2433, ext. 4220, or bbw@ala.org.

Ahoy Maties, it be talk like a pirate day!

“T’ celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day here at AUM, stop by t’ Library and check out these books and more about pirates from t’ Golden Age o’ Piracy.”
The history of Blackbeard & Roche, two noted pyrates: being an account of their robberies and murders, and their final overthrow / written by Capt. Charles Johnson.
The history of the pirates: containing the lives of those noted pirate captains, Misson, Bowen, Kidd, Tew, Halsey, White, Condent, Bellamy, Fly, Howard, Lewis, Cornelius, Williams, Burgess, North, and their crews : also, an account of the piracies and cruelties of John Auger, William Cunningham, Dennis Mackarthy, William Dowling, William Lewis, Thomas Morris, George Bendall, and William Ling, who were tried, condemned and executed at Nassau, New-Providence, on Friday, the 12th of October, 1718 : to which is added, a description of Magadoxa, in Ethiopia. By Capt. Charles Johnson
Blackbeard, or, The captive-princess: A present for the New-Year, 1815
The voyages and adventures of Edward Teach [electronic resource] : commonly called Black Beard, the notorious pirate / by S. Wilkinson ; with an account of the origin and progress of the Roman, Algerine and West India pirates
Check out t’ offical Talk Like a Pirate Day website.
http://www.talklikeapirate.com/piratehome.html