Shriek Week at the Library

It’s Shriek Week at AUM, so the focus this week is on authors who make you scream! Check out some of these horrifying titles by some of the spookiest writers around.
Anne Rice: Queen of the Undead
In the now-classic novel Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice refreshed the archetypal vampire myth for a late-20th-century audience. The story is ostensibly a simple one: having suffered a tremendous personal loss, an 18th-century Louisiana plantation owner named Louis Pointe du Lac descends into an alcoholic stupor. At his emotional nadir, he is confronted by Lestat, a charismatic and powerful vampire who chooses Louis to be his fledgling. The two prey on innocents, give their “dark gift” to a young girl, and seek out others of their kind (notably the ancient vampire Armand) in Paris. But a summary of this story bypasses the central attractions of the novel. First and foremost, the method Rice chose to tell her tale–with Louis’ first-person confession to a skeptical boy–transformed the vampire from a hideous predator into a highly sympathetic, seductive, and all-too-human figure. Second, by entering the experience of an immortal character, one raised with a deep Catholic faith, Rice was able to explore profound philosophical concerns–the nature of evil, the reality of death, and the limits of human perception–in ways not possible from the perspective of a more finite narrator.
While Rice has continued to investigate history, faith, and philosophy in subsequent Vampire novels (including The Vampire Lestat, The Queen of the Damned, The Tale of the Body Thief, Memnoch the Devil, and The Vampire Armand), Interview remains a treasured masterpiece. It is that rare work that blends a childlike fascination for the supernatural with a profound vision of the human condition.
Source: http://www.amazon.com/Interview-Vampire-Anne-Rice/dp/0345409647/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245088876&sr=1-6
Tess Gerritsen: Queen of Suspense
Tess’s first medical thriller, Harvest, was released in hardcover in 1996, and it marked her debut on the New York Times bestseller list. Her suspense novels since then have been: Life Support (1997), Bloodstream (1998), Gravity (1999), The Surgeon (2001), The Apprentice (2002), The Sinner (2003), Body Double (2004), Vanish (2005), The Mephisto Club (2006), The Bone Garden (2007), and The Keepsake (2008). Her books have been translated into 33 languages, and more than 20 million copies have been sold around the world.
Her books have been top-5 bestsellers in both the United States and abroad. She has won both the Nero Wolfe Award (for Vanish) and the Rita Award (for The Surgeon.) Critics around the world have praised her novels as “Pulse-pounding fun” (Philadelphia Inquirer), “Scary and brilliant” (Toronto Globe and Mail), and “Polished, riveting prose” (Chicago Tribune). Publisher Weekly has dubbed her the “medical suspense queen”.
Source: http://www.tessgerritsen.com/biography.html
Edgar Allan Poe: King of Fright
Edgar Allan Poe (1809-1849) was orphaned at the age of three and adopted by a wealthy Virginia family with whom he had a troubled relationship. He excelled in his studies of language and literature at school, and self-published his first book, Tamerlane and Other Poems, in 1827. In 1830, Poe embarked on a career as a writer and began contributing reviews and essays to popular periodicals. He also wrote sketches and short fiction, and in 1833 published his only completed novel, The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket. Over the next five years he established himself as a master of the short story form through the publication of “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Masque of the Red Death,” “The Tell-tale Heart,” and other well-known works. In 1841, he wrote “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” generally considered the first modern detective story. The publication of The Raven and Other Poems in 1845 brought him additional fame as a poet.
Edgar Allan Poe is credited with having pioneered the short story, having perfected the tale of psychological horror, and having revolutionized modern poetics. The entirety of Poe’s body of imaginative work encompasses detective tales, satires, fables, fantasies, science fiction, verse dramas, and some of the most evocative poetry in the English language.
Source: http://search.barnesandnoble.com/The-Complete-Tales-and-Poems-of-Edgar-Allan-Poe/Edgar-Allan-Poe/e/9781435106345/
Stephen King: Master of Horror
Walk into the dark with bestselling author Stephen King, who has terrified readers with his classic novels over the past three decades.
Here are some short descriptions of some of King’s most successful books.
Pet Sematary – “Sometimes, death is better.” Those are the ominous words spoken by Jud Crandall, an elderly resident of Ludlow, Maine to newcomer Louis Creed. Dr. Creed and his family have just moved in to a house across the road from Crandall, who warns them to approach the intersecting highway with caution since many large trucks frequently pass by.
One day Jud takes them for a walk into the forest and shows them a burial ground for dead pets, many of which were run over on the highway. Later, the two men travel further, over a difficult barrier of thick foliage to another cemetery once used by the Micmac Indians. It is here that the dead can come back to life, but when they do, they aren’t quite the same. When Gage, their youngest son, is killed by a speeding truck and then buried in the Native American graveyard, there are horrific consequences for the rest of the Creed family.
It – In the town of Derry something evil is living below the ground in the sewers and storm drains. It likes to kill children, and then hibernate for twenty-seven years before awakening once again to satisfy it’s appetite for human flesh. A group of young kids fight this monster in 1958, and must do so again as adults in 1985 after they find out “It” has come back, and is hungry. They must come to grips with their repressed memories of that fateful encounter long ago, as well as destroy the creature once and for all.
Source: http://horror-fiction.suite101.com/article.cfm/the_books_of_stephen_king

Vampires in the Library!!

Almost every culture in the world has its own vampire legend, and some date back thousands of years. Today, we are most familiar with Count Dracula and other folklore from Eastern Europe. Do you want to learn more? Here is a wealth of juicy trivia to sink your fangs into this Halloween season.
1.Was the first vampire a woman? The oldest known vampire legends come from Babylonian and Sumerian mythology. Female demons called the Lilu were said to hunt women and children at night, and drink their blood.
2. Vlad III Tepes, also known as Vlad Dracul, was known for his incredible cruelty; he was alleged to have killed up to 30,000 people at one time! His bloodthirsty reputation inspired Bram Stoker’s Dracula.
3. The National Retail Federation listed “Vampire” as the second most popular adult Halloween costume in 2005. Vampires were the sixteenth most popular children’s costume for the same year.
4. While modern pop culture usually portrays vampires as sensual and romantic, other countries don’t see them that way: the Ghanan Asasabonsam vampire has iron teeth and hooks for feet – which they drop from treetops onto unsuspecting victims.
5. Some believe that Cain was the first vampire, cursed by God for slaying his brother, Abel. This theory is frequently found in popular films and games.
6. In 1992, Francis Ford Coppola’s “Dracula” movie won seven awards, including three Oscars.
7. Stakes, fire and sunlight aren’t the only ways to kill a vampire. Other cultures recommend beheading a vampire, boiling it in vinegar, pounding a nail through its navel, or scattering birdseed on its tomb.
8. In Latin American folklore, El Chupacabras is a supernatural creature that drinks the blood of animals – usually chickens and goats.
9. According to popular tradition, vampires can shape-shift into wolves, bats, or clouds of mist.
10. In March 2007, self-proclaimed vampire hunters entered the tomb of Slobodan Milosevic and staked his body through the heart.

Source:http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/361065/halloween_monster_trivia_13_facts_about.html?cat=37

Books with a Bite!

All Hallow’s Eve is almost upon us, and the AUM Library is getting into the ‘spirit’ by featuring books with a bite! Check out these tasty treats and more at the Library this month. That is if you aren’t afraid of things that go bump in the night…
Interview with the Vampire By Anne Rice
In the now-classic novel Interview with the Vampire, Anne Rice refreshed the archetypal vampire myth for a late-20th-century audience. The story is ostensibly a simple one: having suffered a tremendous personal loss, an 18th-century Louisiana plantation owner named Louis Pointe du Lac descends into an alcoholic stupor. At his emotional nadir, he is confronted by Lestat, a charismatic and powerful vampire who chooses Louis to be his fledgling. The two prey on innocents, give their “dark gift” to a young girl, and seek out others of their kind (notably the ancient vampire Armand) in Paris. But a summary of this story bypasses the central attractions of the novel. First and foremost, the method Rice chose to tell her tale–with Louis’ first-person confession to a skeptical boy–transformed the vampire from a hideous predator into a highly sympathetic, seductive, and all-too-human figure. Second, by entering the experience of an immortal character, one raised with a deep Catholic faith, Rice was able to explore profound philosophical concerns–the nature of evil, the reality of death, and the limits of human perception–in ways not possible from the perspective of a more finite narrator.
Source: http://www.amazon.com/Interview-Vampire-Anne-Rice/dp/0345337662
Located on the 2nd floor in the Browsing Collection
Dracula: The Connoisseur’s Guide By Leonard Wolf
In the 100 years since its publication, Bram Stoker’s Dracula has never been out of print. Once introduced to the world by the silent film classic Nosferatu in 1921, Dracula became an enduring icon of fear, forever immortalized as a frightful embodiment of evil and forbidden sexuality.Now, in this fascinating and entertaining account, Wolf examines the various interpretations of the immortal vampire in print, film, television, theater, and literature, including an extensive outline of Bram Stoker’s life and his literary masterpiece, Dracula. Wolf explains how the story of a sexually sadistic undead creature/man who feeds on blood worked its way into mainstream society and how it is now used as a ubiquitous marketing tool for products from hair tonic to children’s breakfast cereal.
Source: http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/w/leonard-wolf/dracula.htm
Located on the 5th floor PN56 .V3 W65 1997
30 Days of Night By Steve Niles, Ben Templesmith
In a sleepy, secluded Alaska town called Barrow, the sun sets and doesn’t rise for over thirty consecutive days and nights. From the darkness, across the frozen wasteland, an evil will come that will bring the residents of Barrow to their knees. The only hope for the town is the Sheriff and Deputy, husband and wife who are torn between their own survival and saving the town they love.
Source: http://www.amazon.com/30-Days-Night-Steve-Niles/dp/0971977550
Located on the 5th floor PN6727 .N55 A15 2007
The Hammer Horror Series Collection of classic horror films
Hammer Films, one of the most celebrated horror studios in the history of cinema, presents 8 classic horror films in one collection. From Dracula to Frankenstein, werewolves to phantoms, the Hammer Horror Series showcases some of the most terrifying monsters in the history of cinema and features legendary performances by Peter Cushing, Oliver Reed and Janette Scott.
Source: http://www.amazon.com/Werewolf-Paranoiac-Nightmare-Creatures-Frankenstein/dp/B0009X770O
Located on the 2nd floor in the Media Collection PN1995.9.H6 H255 2005

AUM Archival Nuggets

October is National Archives Month, to celebrate we’re focusing on the holdings of the Library’s Archives & Special Collections Department. The Archives & Special Collections dept. was created in 1986 and is home to official university records, rare and unique books, manuscript collections and photos. Stop by and check us out! We’re located on the 8th floor in the Library Tower.
The AUM Archives & Special Collections Department is home to the following collections:
Wayne Greenhaw:
Greenhaw has published fifteen books of fiction and nonfiction. He has worked on prize-winning TV productions, and two plays he wrote have been produced. He has worked as editor and has taught journalism and creative writing.
He was also the 2006 recipient of the Harper Lee Award for Alabama’s Distinguished Writer, given annually by the Alabama Writers’ Forum and Alabama Southern Community College at Monroeville’s Alabama Writers’ Symposium.
http://www.waynegreenhaw.com/index.php?page_id=236 & http://www.southernscribe.com/contact/contributors.htm
Capri Theatre:
The Capri Community Film Society was organized in 1983 to save Montgomery’s only remaining neighborhood theater as an operating movie house. Constructed in 1941 in an Art Deco style, the Clover Theater served as the neighborhood theater for the Cloverdale area. As a non-profit agency, the Society is unique in that it is the only non-profit film society outside of New York that operates its own theater. http://aumnicat.aum.edu/departments/archives/capri.pd
U.S. Congressman William Dickinson:
2nd District Representative from 1964-1992. In 1964, Dickinson was elected as a Republican to the U.S. House of Representatives for the Second District of Alabama; he served on the Armed Services Committee until he left office in 1992.

http://aumnicat.aum.edu/departments/archives/dickinson.html

Lella Warren:
Her national, and even international, reputation is based primarily on the success of a single book, Foundation Stone, a historical novel about a family that settled in Alabama in the frontier period of the 1820s. Favorably compared with Gone with the Wind, Foundation Stone was a huge popular success.

http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-2348